The Astral Pulse

Astral Projection & Out of Body Experiences => Welcome to Astral Consciousness! => Topic started by: Phalanx on December 22, 2017, 09:44:05



Title: Trouble stepping into the scene..
Post by: Phalanx on December 22, 2017, 09:44:05
Lately I have been trying to project by a visualization method, and there are two similar methods of this that I am trying.
One method, requires one to build a scene in ones imagination without you in it, let the scenery come alive and live of its own and then to step into it.
And the other requires one to build a scene like before but to build it around you already in it as you interact with it.

Well, I have a problem with each and they are kind of similar...

The first, I can get up to the point where it requires one to step into the scene... and then I just cant seem to be able to step into it... I end up just passively watching the scene as a non participant until the allotted time for meditation/visualization is over and I have to move on to other things or until I fall asleep, and when I fall asleep the dreams don't continue the visualization they go off about something else.
I don't mind watching the scenes play out passively at times it can actually be quite a valuable tool sometimes.

The latter I have a hard time visualizing from the first person, its ends up being third person like I am watching a play with myself onstage, with the same issue of just ending up kind of passively watching but in this case I am like a puppeteer where I can control the actions of the me onstage while I sit in the crowd. And same like before time runs along or I fall asleep.

So from the looks/sounds of it I have trouble stepping into the scene over all... and I am  at the point I don't know what to do.
Some fresh eyes, ears, perspectives are welcome. What are some ideas I could try concepts I should think of, I am all ears.


Title: Re: Trouble stepping into the scene..
Post by: Nameless on December 22, 2017, 15:36:51
This happens to me as well Phalanx. One thing I have found that works (depending on the scene you are creating of course) is to create some sort of fast moving barrier between yourself and your scene.

Like for example, a fast moving river. Your intent is that to get into the scene you have to enter the river and get 'swept' across. When you do this the idea is that the river is moving so fast you just naturally lose your bearing becoming part of the river.

It could be anything fast that you can create as an entry point. Mind that you may lose yourself and enter without a body.


Title: Re: Trouble stepping into the scene..
Post by: Lumaza on December 22, 2017, 22:57:47
 I find that when you are in a deep enough NP focus, that you don't need to "step in" to anything. You just find yourself part of that environment, just like you do here. My advice would be to work on holding your "complete" focus on your target scenario. Practice it often. Start simple with just easy objects, like an apple or a orange. Then move on to a motion based focus. For this try 6 pts of direction, up/down/, left/right/ and forward/backwards. Get the "feel" of that focus. A focus on etheric movement pulls you deeper faster. I find this is because other senses are getting involved too. It's no longer just a "visual" thing.
 Practice this daily and you will find that ability to "be", in a scenario, will be enhanced greatly.

 Once the speed of one or another direction, like the rapid movement forward occurs and you get used to it, you will see why we say "motion bases" focus is really important in Phasing. I find the focus on backward movement to be the most "thrilling". You really don't know what to expect. Which is why "expectations" are a bad thing in the NP. Things don't necessarily appear exactly how you expected. It's better to learn to be a good "observer" first. I see you mentioned "passively watching". I think you are almost where you want to be. Keep it up.

 Another thing you can do is to use a "Pace car" and follow it in. Many times when I attempt to hold my focus on the direction forward, a "lead vehicle" will appear and following it brings me right into the scene itself. Example, focus on forward, a Horse is there running ahead of me. I follow it, then get closer and closer, until I am finally riding it, or the Horse itself. I also use this when I want to go to the stars and have some really cool adventures. I will watch as a Rocket launches up into the air. I will stay with that until it reaches a height where I lose sight of it.  That happens fast because it's a Rocket, lol. I then will the visual of the Rocket where it currently is and instantly I find myself beside it watching it go even higher until I lose of it again. Rinse and repeat. The cool thing is, every time I pull it back into view, the "background" has changed anew. I see a whole new "atmosphere" every time.

 Doing things like that really shows you how adventurous your encounters can be. If your attention is needed elsewhere, you will find yourself "elsewhere". This does not take away from the "Spiritual" nature of this practice. This is just helping you get there. What you do then is personal.


Title: Re: Trouble stepping into the scene..
Post by: Xanth on December 27, 2017, 02:42:35
As the others have pointed out, it's not really an active "step" you take.  It's not really something you "do"... it's more of an action which you get out of the way from happening.
It's the difference between jumping off a cliff and allowing yourself to simply fall off the cliff.  Understand?

When you jump off a cliff, you're starting the action and following it through to the end.
When you allow yourself to fall off a cliff, you're starting the action, then simply allowing the action to follow through to its inevitable conclusion.

So, do as the others have stated above.  Start the action, then sit back and enjoy the ride.  Usually what we humans end up doing is getting our conscious mind stuck in the process, which ends up being counter-intuitive to what you're actually trying to accomplish.

The use of "motion based visualizations", at least I find, work EXTREMELY well to promote that falling action to occur.