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Author Topic: Having full-immersion issues with visualization?  (Read 534 times)
madmagus
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« on: December 15, 2016, 11:59:04 »

I'm throwing something out that may help those having problems with visualization and full immersion as a focal method for projection/phasing, or simply meditation.  If you have your visualization skills down pat, this may or may not be as helpful.

What I'm sharing is all based on daydreams.  You'll notice that you have no problem becoming fully immersed in the daydream scenario.  And you become immersed very quickly, almost instantly.  If you are having pain, the pain evades notice while you are in the daydream.  In other words, you become fully engrossed in the 'other' environment to the point of losing recognition of your physical sensory input.  And you do it without any training, without any effort, without any techniques.

What helped my visualization skill set, regarding projecting/phasing in particular, was when I looked at daydreams to figure out why I could so easily, and so quickly, become immersed.  I realized that what was present in the daydream, that was not usually present early on in a visualization exercise, was my becoming involved fully in whatever daydream scene I had chosen.  But why was that so?  Why was a daydream so easy to get involved in and a regular visualization exercise a bigger chore? 

What I realized specifically was that I was caught up in the movement and in the emotion associated with the daydream.   It wasn't a bland environment as still as a tomb.

I also found that rapid, almost jerky movement was initially best.  The quick, spontaneous movements kept my mind focused on my actions, kept me in the moment far better than, say, sitting down on a dream cushion and trying to meditate from within the visualization.  In other words, the more daydream stimulation (including my emotional reaction to the situation) I encountered early in the daydream, the more fully I was engaged with that reality.  Simple tactile input alone usually wasn't enough.  It's generally not strong enough emotionally, sensorily. 

Exp.:  Feel the difference between 1) visualizing a slow walk down a lonely beach and 2) crouching on that same beach with your feet digging into the wet sand fighting with every once of strength you have to land the shark you inadvertently hooked while surf fishing.  In the second, emotional impact is high and movement is high as you fight with your rod against the pull of the shark.  You are fully engaged with the scene.

Engage with movement.  Engage with emotions.  You don't have to be bawling.  Just get into the excitement, mild or extreme, associated with you scenario.  If you are on a roller coaster, get caught up in how it feels to have the wind blow through your hair as you race around the track, getting jerked from side to side on every turn.  Be there.

With this simple skill, you'll open an easy-access pass to visualization-based projection/phasing.

A lot of you may already do this.  But for those who haven't stumbled onto this visualization key, I hope it helps.  It takes minimal time to develop, because everyone is already great at part of it.   

Once you have this skill down, once you've trained yourself to quickly enter the appropriate mental space for phasing, then look at the actual projection/phasing techniques, if you still need them.

Dr. Tom Campbell says that phasing is just a matter of refocusing your mind to the proper focus point.   This is an easy way to get focused.
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madmagus
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« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2016, 12:18:33 »

A point that I didn't highlight enough is that continuous action is what draws your attention the best.  Even something as simple as flipping a coin over and over into the air and following its path with your eyes.  Your focus on the continuous motion is what keeps your attention within the envisioned environment and doesn't allow your mind to so easily wander back to the physical.
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« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2016, 12:18:33 »

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Astral Projection, Metaphysics and many other subjects.

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