The Astral Pulse

Metaphysics => Welcome to Metaphysics! => Topic started by: Van-Stolin on October 15, 2003, 02:56:30



Title: Who believed in the Year 2000 stuff?
Post by: Van-Stolin on October 15, 2003, 02:56:30
I didn't think that the computers would crash, partially becuase my dad told me they fixed it.  I did think that something strange had happened the minute that it turned 2000.  It was a weird tingling in my back and then it went away.  I don't know if it was something that was going to effect just me or if it was something else.


Title: Who believed in the Year 2000 stuff?
Post by: Nagual on October 15, 2003, 06:33:45
Nothing much happened because most companies fixed it...  I heard of like 10 big (whole system paralyzed) Y2K incidents worldwide.  But it's not over yet:  [:D][;)]

2005: Some really old versions of Unix (e.g. 16-bit BSD) die this year?

2009: Early claims were that this was the date that FAA would finish Y2K preparations

2014: End of the world...

2020: January 1: Systems still using 1920 as pivot date fail; Macintoshes running System 6.0.4 or earlier - correct date can no longer be set in Date & Time Control Panel

2030: January 1: Systems still using 1930 as pivot date fail.

2036: January 1: Burroughs Unisys A Series system date fails?

2036: February 6: 2^32 seconds from Jan 1, 1900.

2037: January 1: Rollover date for NTP systems

2038: January 19: Unix: 2^31 seconds from Jan 1, 1970

2040: February 6: At 06:28:16, old Macs' longword seconds from Jan 1, 1904 overflow.

2042: September 17: IBM 370 TOD clock overflows. One source lists this as the 18th (?)

2044: January 1: MS-DOS: 2^6 years from 1980, setting the most significant bit (MSB). Signed variables using this get a negative date.

2046: January 1: Amiga system date failure

2046: June 8: Some Unix password aging fails; 62^2 weeks from 1970.

2049: December 31: Microsoft Project 95 limit.

2078: December 31: MS Excel 7.0 - the last day

2079: June 6: 2^16 days from January 1, 1900

2080: January 1: MS-DOS file dates, displayed with two-digit years, become ambiguous.

2100: Y2.1K; most current PC BIOSes run out of dates; MS-DOS <DIR> renders the file-date years 2100 through 2107 as 99.

2100: February 28: last day of February - NOT a leap year

2106: February 7: Unix: 2^32 seconds from Jan 1, 1970; time overflows at 06:28:16.

2108: January 1: MS-DOS 2^7 years from 1980; file date overflows

2738: November 28: Approximate day of A.D. 1 million (days)

4338: November 28: COBOL-85 integer day 1,000,000 (10^6) exceeds six-digit field

9999: HTTP caching fails.

10000: January 1: Y10K!! Four-digit years fail. More time will elapse between the time this document was written and this date than has elapsed from the beginning of modern human civilization until now.

29602: January 1: MS Windows NT File Systems (NTFS) fails.

29940: New Macs' signed 64-bit time fails (has been OK since 30,081 B.C.!!)

31086: July 31: Internal DEC VMS time fails at 02:48:05.47

60056: Win32 64-bit time fails (started from Jan 1, 1601)


Title: Who believed in the Year 2000 stuff?
Post by: jc84corvette on October 15, 2003, 00:56:02
Who feared that Computers would totaly screw the world over? I didn't worry. I knew nothing would happen, but if it happend I would be like eah. heh

Thanks!